Daniel Murray (1823 – 1852)

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Name: Murray, Daniel

IDENTITY STATEMENT

Reference Code: IE/DDA/AB3
Title: Papers of Archbishop Daniel Murray
Dates: 1823 – 1852
Level of Description: Fonds
Extent: 21 boxes

CONTEXT

Daniel Murray was born at Sheepwalk, Arklow, County Wicklow, on 18 April 1768.  His parents were Thomas and Judith Murray.  He went to the school of Rev. Thomas Betagh S.J. at Saul’s Court,  near Christchurch Cathedral, when he was eight years old.  His main interest was in Latin and Greek.  At sixteen, Archbishop John Carpenter sent him to the Irish College of Salamanca, Spain.  There he studied theology and philosophy.  The rector, Dr. Curtis, stated that Murray had a real ecclesiastical vocation and was of great promise.  He was ordained in 1792 at the age of 24.

In 1793 Murray was appointed Curate at St. Paul’s, Arran Quay.  He was transferred to Arklow in 1795 and remained there until after the 1798 Rebellion.  In that year his Parish Priest was murdered by the yeomanry but he survived the attack.  He managed to escape to Dublin through the kind assistance of the Protestant Rector, Rev. Mr. Bailey.  He was immediately appointed as Curate to St. Andrew’s Chapel, Hawkins Street.  Here he earned a reputation as a preacher and gave several Charity Sermons for the financial support of poor schools.  He remained at Hawkins Street for two years before being appointed to the Chapel of St. Mary in Upper Liffey Street where Archbishop Troy was the Parish Priest.  He was soon marked out as a possible successor to the Archbishop.  Troy petitioned Pope Pius VII for a co-adjutor in 1809 and advised the appointment of Fr. Murray who was now only 41 years old.

In 1811 Murray was appointed Administrator of St. Andrew’s, Hawkins Street and in 1812 as President of Maynooth College.  He returned to Hawkins Street in 1814 and shortly afterwards laid the foundation stone for the new Chapel in Townsend Street.  Two years later he laid the foundation stone for the Pro-Cathedral.

Daniel Murray became Archbishop in 1825.   He died at his residence, 9 Mountjoy Square (now number 44) on 26 February 1852.  He was 84 years old.   He is buried in the vaults at the Pro-Cathedral.

CONTENT AND STRUCTURE

Archbishop Murray was very involved with pastoral work throughout the diocese.  Many of the penal laws had been disregarded and relaxed but their effect was still evident.  During his episcopacy, Murray oversaw the building of over 90 churches, including St. Mary’s, Haddington Road and St. James’s.  The number of priests in the diocese almost doubled, with the numbers attending religious services growing all the time.  Sodalities became very popular and Archbishop Murray fostered devotion to Our Lady and the Rosary.

He had a very keen interest in the area education and was determined to find some means of educating the Catholic poor.  Schools did exist, some managed by religious orders and others privately run and often indifferently staffed.  Proselytising schools on the other hand, were numerous and well financed.  With this in mind, Archbishop Murray aided the foundation of such orders as the Sisters of Charity, Loreto, and Sisters of Mercy.  He invited the Christian Brothers to establish a school for boys within the diocese. In 1831 the government proposed a scheme for education which was to be non-denominational.  Murray was aware of the risks involved but also saw the good it offered.  As a result, he became a Commissioner of National Education.  He also encouraged Fr. Hand to establish All Hallows College, Drumcondra, for the education of priests for missionary countries.

As Archbishop, Murray had to deal with many political situations which arose.  He had to appear before Government Commissions of Inquiry to give evidence on matters relating to Emancipation.  He had to engage in discussions in defence of the faith and preside at the Maynooth Synod which was held shortly after Emancipation had been granted.

There was an out break of cholera in the 1830s and this enabled Murray to fulfil another ambition, namely the foundation of a Catholic hospital.  In 1834 with the help of Mother Aikenhead, St. Vincent’s Hospital was founded.

He was instrumental in introducing the Society of St. Vincent de Paul as well as the members of the re-established Society of Jesus and the Vincentians.

His papers reflect all aspects of his episcopacy and are divided into categories including the Holy See, Bishops, Priests, Nuns and Laity.  There are papers on the Famine and the Catholic Association.

The collection of Archbishop Murray is complimented by the papers of his secretary Archdeacon Hamilton, which number 21 boxes in total.

Daniel Murray was born at Sheepwalk, Arklow, County Wicklow, on 18 April 1768.  His parents were Thomas and Judith Murray.  He went to the school of Rev. Thomas Betagh S.J. at Saul’s Court,  near Christchurch Cathedral, when he was eight years old.  His main interest was in Latin and Greek.  At sixteen, Archbishop John Carpenter sent him to the Irish College of Salamanca, Spain.  There he studied theology and philosophy.  The rector, Dr. Curtis, stated that Murray had a real ecclesiastical vocation and was of great promise.  He was ordained in 1792 at the age of 24.  In 1793 Murray was appointed Curate at St. Paul’s, Arran Quay.  He was transferred to Arklow in 1795 and remained there until after the 1798 Rebellion.  In that year his Parish Priest was murdered by the yeomanry but he survived the attack.  He managed to escape to Dublin through the kind assistance of the Protestant Rector, Rev. Mr. Bailey.  He was immediately appointed as Curate to St. Andrew’s Chapel, Hawkins Street.  Here he earned a reputation as a preacher and gave several Charity Sermons for the financial support of poor schools.  He remained at Hawkins Street for two years before being appointed to the Chapel of St. Mary in Upper Liffey Street where Archbishop Troy was the Parish Priest.  He was soon marked out as a possible successor to the Archbishop.  Troy petitioned Pope Pius VII for a co-adjutor in 1809 and advised the appointment of Fr. Murray who was now only 41 years old.  In 1811 Murray was appointed Administrator of St. Andrew’s, Hawkins Street and in 1812 as President of Maynooth College.  He returned to Hawkins Street in 1814 and shortly afterwards laid the foundation stone for the new Chapel in Townsend Street.  Two years later he laid the foundation stone for the Pro-Cathedral.Daniel Murray became Archbishop in 1825.   He died at his residence, 9 Mountjoy Square (now number 44) on 26 February 1852.  He was 84 years old.   He is buried in the vaults at the Pro-Cathedral.  Murray oversaw the building of over 90 churches, including St. Mary’s, Haddington Road and St. James’s.  The number of priests in the diocese almost doubled, with the numbers attending religious services growing all the time.  Sodalities became very popular and Archbishop Murray fostered devotion to Our Lady and the Rosary.He had a very keen interest in the area education and was determined to find some means of educating the Catholic poor.  Schools did exist, some managed by religious orders and others privately run and often indifferently staffed.  Proselytising schools on the other hand, were numerous and well financed.  With this in mind, Archbishop Murray aided the foundation of such orders as the Sisters of Charity, Loreto, and Sisters of Mercy.  He invited the Christian Brothers to establish a school for boys within the diocese. In 1831 the government proposed a scheme for education which was to be non-denominational.  Murray was aware of the risks involved but also saw the good it offered.  As a result, he became a Commissioner of National Education.  He also encouraged Fr. Hand to establish All Hallows College, Drumcondra, for the education of priests for missionary countries.  As Archbishop, Murray had to deal with many political situations which arose.  He had to appear before Government Commissions of Inquiry to give evidence on matters relating to Emancipation.  He had to engage in discussions in defence of the faith and preside at the Maynooth Synod which was held shortly after Emancipation had been granted.  There was an out break of cholera in the 1830s and this enabled MurraySt. Vincent’s Hospital was founded.   He was instrumental in introducing the Society of St. Vincent de Paul as well as the members of the re-established Society of Jesus and the Vincentians.

CONDITIONS OF ACCESS AND USE
Access: Available by appointment only
Language: English and occasional Latin
Finding Aid: Descriptive Catalogue

 

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